Today I learned that 80% of students in one of my classes are still learning how to read. Like, they’re still learning to decode two syllable, three syllable words.

What do I do??

Why I love teaching _______________:

tunedintoteaching:

itsssnix:

Why do you love teaching the grade level you teach at?

The “ah ha” moments in kindergarten are the best moments.

I love watching the moments self-discovery and maturation that goes on in seventh grade.

I almost cried during my Intervention period. 

I am going to miss these kids.

I almost cried during my Intervention period.

I am going to miss these kids.

Introverted teachers,

How do you deal with the exhaustion of being “on” all week long?

I’m not so sure I’m handling it well.

How I know I picked the right career:

Even with less than four hours of sleep, waking up 30 minutes after my alarm, NO COFFEE, terrible traffic on the highway, and the Gradebook being a jerk, as soon as I saw my students, everything lifted, and I knew it would be a good day. 

And it really, really was. 

AMAZING things of October 24

1) During my Check-In with my content manager, I was informed that my kids’ scores on their benchmark were the highest 7th grade ELA scores (for the 1st benchmark) in the school’s history. 

2) It’s been such a productive, positive week with my homeroom. They had the highest scores of all my classes, so I’m hosting a pizza/movie night next Friday. The kids are super excited, and they’re finally working as a team to keep everyone on track. 

3) In class, we’re working on writing original myths, and the kids are having so much fun with it. Final drafts with illustrations are due tomorrow, and I cannot wait to see what they’ve come up with. 

I think the hardest thing about my job right now is that my students don’t understand how much I care about them and that everything I do is because I want the absolute best for each and everyone of them.

I’ll post something about my difficulties with classroom management later.

Please tell me I’m not the only teacher suffering from bouts of pre-Monday anxiety. 

Because oh boy. 

We finally got our books today! I’m pretty excited about all the writing projects and the diversity in our texts I’ve seen just glancing through. 
Sarah is a happy first year teacher right now. :D

We finally got our books today! I’m pretty excited about all the writing projects and the diversity in our texts I’ve seen just glancing through.

Sarah is a happy first year teacher right now. :D

I’ve decided I’m going to record my daily thoughts about teaching starting next week. I haven’t done a daily journal since mid-Spring semester, so I’d like to get back into that routine.  Plus, this is going to be an extremely arduous time for me; reflection would probably help a ton.

I want to chart my growth as a teacher and document what it’s like to be an RGV student at a charter school. I know what my life was like as a Valley student,  but the culture of where I’ll be teaching seems like the exact opposite of my high school. In a good way. I lived for my clubs in high school since so many of my classes were completely unstimulating.

I probably won’t post much about it on Tumblr, though.

Well. 
Maybe.  

Harry K. Wong’s The First Days of School

One of my tías bought me this book and said she found it extremely useful, so I was wondering what the #Education community thought about it. 

Love it/hate it? What did you find helpful? Or, what didn’t you like about it?

I’ve been on the hunt for great teacher resources, so any advice would be greatly appreciated! 

I have an idea for a classroom theme.

I’ll be teaching 6th grade English-Language Arts next year, and I remember my 6th English teacher had an underwater theme in her classroom. Everyone really loved it, and we got to bring in little things to decorate, and she had this really cute board called “Our School of Fish” with our fishy-faced pictures on it. It was a really wonderful environment, so I kind of want to do something similar in my class.

I’m toying with the idea of having a jungle theme? And my students will be “Explorers of Literature?” I’m sorry but not sorry that I’m so incredibly corny, but I think it might work and be kind of fun?

Anyway, I was thinking that with each learned objective, we’d add a new leaf to a massive vine that can wrap around room, high up on the wall? And I could have a board that features students like “Explorers of the Week/Month?” And have another board called “Gems of the Jungle” that features awesome student work? 

I’m really just thinking these things out loud. I want students to feel engaged with my room and feel like it’s a stimulating, creative, nurturing environment, but I also don’t want my room to distract them. So I suppose moderation is key. Keeping things organized is key and will be at the forefront of how I go about planning my room. Keeping all this affordable is also key, so I’ll probably try to hand-make the decorative things—like the vine. Or have the students do a little craft-y thing. Like I said—this idea isn’t fully fleshed-out yet. 

Ideas on how to make my room functional but still incorporate a theme? Is this theme even good at all?

So, I just finished my final interview.

The two interviewers asked me pretty general questions: why I wanted to be a teacher, why I wanted to work for them, how I’ve overcome a challenge… questions similar to those of the phone interview.


I was most nervous about my lesson plan, but they said I was very well prepared and provided a great lesson! They did have some constructive criticism, but they thought the overall lesson was successful.

SO YES.

I’ll know if I’m going to be a middle school ELA teacher by the 17th! I’m relieved and excited and nervous and so many things I can’t put to words.

"OHMYGOODNESS" Good Things of Today

1) I delivered a 20 minute presentation about Arizona’s HB 2281, and got the class engaged in a critical discussion for about 30 minutes.

BUT REALLY:
I GOT A FINAL INTERVIEW WITH THE CAMPUS OF MY DREAMS.

image

The interview is for a Middle School English-Language Arts position, and I have a little over a week to prepare a lesson plan and 5-10 minute production of it.

Guys.

This is a big deal.

Like

Huge.

gjmueller:

Students Place a Premium on Faculty Who Show They Care

Most teachers know that caring for students is important, but do they realize just how important? A recent article by Steven A. Meyers offers a succinct, well-referenced, and persuasive review of research that addresses the topic. It begins with what most teachers already know: Caring is regularly identified as one of the ingredients or components of effective instruction. What many teachers do not know is that students value the dimensions of caring more highly than teachers do. 

photo via flickr:CC | peoplesworld

gjmueller:

Students Place a Premium on Faculty Who Show They Care

Most teachers know that caring for students is important, but do they realize just how important? A recent article by Steven A. Meyers offers a succinct, well-referenced, and persuasive review of research that addresses the topic. It begins with what most teachers already know: Caring is regularly identified as one of the ingredients or components of effective instruction. What many teachers do not know is that students value the dimensions of caring more highly than teachers do.

photo via flickr:CC | peoplesworld